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Saturday, February 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Aristotle"s theory of human motivation found in the catalog.

Aristotle"s theory of human motivation

Alfred Remen Mele

Aristotle"s theory of human motivation

  • 124 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aristotle.,
  • Motivation (Psychology)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Alfred Remen Mele.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 369 leaves.
    Number of Pages369
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16470699M

    Aristotle felt as though becoming a virtuous person was a matter of habit and could be learned over time The good person, the one who has attained eudaemonia, is the standard as to what is truly pleasant or unpleasant. Though written more than 2, years ago, it offers the modern reader many valuable insights into human needs and conduct. Indeed, comedy and tragedy both have a moralizing effect on the audience. Therefore eudemonia is something based within human nature but needs a social input in order to reach actualization.

    His concern here is with the ratios in which goods are exchanged. It is this individuality within nature that compels us towards certain vices over others, so some are likely to be more idle, some more ignorant, others tempted by avaritia. When money becomes an intermediate element in exchange, the natural limits on physical wants no longer exercise restraints on a person's desires. Their metaphysical theories are complete opposites and very contradicting Morality comes from inner strength, character and how we live our life to the best end. Aristotle said in his book, Rhetoric: 'Thus every action must be due to one or other of seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reasoning, anger, or appetite.

    In the Topics he stated that the value of one good could be determined if we add it or lose it to a given complex of things. I believe that some of the basics of his ideas still hold true today. Martin Luther King, Jr. There exist no natural conditions restricting a person's desire to acquire money wealth. Mode of Imitation A poet can imitate either through: a.


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Aristotles theory of human motivation book

To return to a point made earlier about Aristotle arguing that there was no such thing as an underlying human nature shared by all men. As well as being a devoted biologist, botanist, moral philosopher, psychologist, zoologist and many more things besides Aristotle held a view about human nature that he interwove into his concept of virtue theory, this is described at some length in the text Nicomachean Ethics.

Melancholics and all those with moisture around that part which is the centre of sense perception feel this kind of discomfort very strongly, as once the moisture has been set in motion it is not easily brought to rest until the sought-after idea has again presented itself.

In Book I of the Politics, Aristotle distinguishes between use value and exchange value. In the third form of exchange, retail trade, a person buys in order to sell at a profit.

The needs of a human being are felt more unconsciously than conciously, thus cultural and social context do not play a significant role in the theory of needs.

Aristotle also acknowledges that there may be a component of human nature which drives us to idleness [12]. Human beings seek to fulfill their perfection via action.

He explains that money was introduced to satisfy the requirement that all items exchanged must be comparable in some way. This is less evident in comedy, perhaps, since "comedies tend to be about bad behavior and people doing ugly, immoral, or ridiculous things.

Everything from playing chess to making love is improved with skill.

A Theory of Human Motivation summary

The Problem of Commensurability Aristotle discovered, formulated, and analyzed the problem of commensurability. He also holds: that the use value of a good or service will be increased if it can be consumed conspicuously; that demand will fluctuate as the extent of the use of the item is limited or wide-ranging; and that exchange value and demand are affected by the circumstances of rarity or scarcity.

Imitation, furthermore, is an innate instinct, says Aristotle, that is 'implanted in man from childhood. David McClelland's Human Motivation Theory gives you a way of identifying people's motivating drivers.

The use value or utility of a good or service depends upon its being productive of an individual person's good. Aristotle explains that wealth derives its value from its contribution to the acquisition of other goods desirable for their own sake.

There exist no natural conditions restricting a person's desire to acquire money wealth. However what Aristotle is doing is accepting that his knowledge has reached its limits and is allowing those with a greater understanding to fill in the details of his theory, hence he was not being idle but prudent; prudence being one of the four most worshipped virtues in Ancient Greece the four being prudence, justice, temperance and courage ; about how much he knows.

The goal of speculative science is knowledge for its own sake. Aristotle maintains that property must be used in a way that is compatible with its nature. Particular justice involves quantitative relationships. It is in this work that he concentrates on the problem of commensurability.

Once poetry emerged, it evolved in two directions.Aristotle was one of the greatest philosophers and scientists the world has ever seen. He was born in bc at Stagirus, a Greek seaport on the coast of Thrace.

His father, Nichomachus, court physician to King Amyntus II of Macedon, died while he was still a boy, and his guardian, Proxenus, sent him to complete his education at the age of 17 in Plato's Academy in Athens.

Aristotle's Seven Causes

Get this from a library! Aristotle's Ethics: moral development and human nature. [Hope May] -- "Hope May offers a new interpretation of Aristotle's account of flourishing - one which incorporates Aristotle's views about the biological development of human beings.

May argues that the. May 15,  · These implausible claims seem to me to originate in a serious interpretative mistake in May's book: her view that Aristotle was, essentially, a hedonist.

This view is never explicitly defended, but it appears in a number of passages and permeates her account of Aristotle's theory of human motivation. Aristotle's Ethics: Moral Development and Human Nature (Continuum Studies in Ancient Philosophy Book 55) - Kindle edition by Hope May.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Aristotle's Ethics: Moral Development and Human Nature (Continuum Studies in Ancient Philosophy Book 55).

To provide a more clear understanding of Aristotle’s theory of emotion, it is also necessary to look at his views on human psychology and soul, which ar e characteristically found in the O n. In a lost work, On Ideas, Aristotle maintains that the arguments of Plato’s central dialogues establish only that there are, in addition to particulars, certain common objects of the sciences.

In his surviving works as well, Aristotle often takes issue with the theory of Forms, sometimes politely .